Evolving Port

Port Melbourne and Fishermans Bend continue to change. Houses are changed or demolished and new forms of housing take their place. Port Houses records some of these changes.

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

538 Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne

July 2018

Demolition has finished. The site is clear. 

Note the proximity to North Port Oval with the Norm Goss stand clearly in view.




May 2018

Deconstruction of the buildings continues behind these hoardings.

Raglan St looking east towards Ross St
March 2018

Demolition of the buildings on site has begun.

December 2017

Approval was sought for an amendment to the permit to allow for a five level building with 15 apartments and 17 x three storey townhouses.

June 2017 

Marketing has begun for The Standard "Townhomes and Boutique apartments". Front row seats for the Football at North Port Oval - surprisingly not mentioned in the many locational advantages in the promotional material.

June 2017
The Standard will be made up of 17 three bedroom townhouses, and 15 one and two bedroom apartments.

Developer: The Cubo Group

July 2015

The site of ATA Distributors (Abrahsives, Tapes, Adhesives Packaging Systems) was sold by Mulcahy & Co in July 2015.



2015
June 2015

Planning application 667/2015 was approved by the City of Port Phillip for a four storey building with 11 apartments and 17 townhouses.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Alumuna - 9 Johnston St, Port Melbourne

ALUMUNA

July 2018

Bayside Construct, builders of this development, have gone into administration with 49 people made redundant. (source AFR 10 July 2018)


April 2016


Marketing begins for the Alumuna development by Wood Marsh architecture. Wood Marsh's Beacon project is in the same block.



Developer Peter Maher, Strange Fellow Investments


September 2015

An application was lodged on the 9 September 2015 for development of a six storey building containing 28 apartments.

The site had been used for carparking for many years.

9 Johnston St, Port Melbourne






Tuesday, July 10, 2018

199-201 Normanby Rd, Southbank

July 2018

The permit for this site has been amended to include an AC Marriott Hotel. It will also include a reduced number of apartments - 111. (source: AFR, July 9 2018)

June 2018

199-201 Normanby Rd, formerly a scrap metal merchant, is becoming Normanby. Marketing has begun for Normanby Melbourne.


Note the Gravity Tower to the rear and right of the photograph and 'cash for scrap' indicating the site's former use as a scrap metal recycling facility.


June 2018
November 2017

Capital Alliance purchased the site from the scrap metal dealer for $13.5m in November 2017, $11 psm.

Permit 2013/009628 was issued by Planning Minister Matthew Guy on 1 September 2014.

Height 121m
Levels 40 levels
Architect DKO Architecture

November 2015

On the move again. The scrap metal merchant's premises are for sale.

November 2015

September 2014

Planning permit was issued by Planning Minister Matthew Guy on 1 September 2014.


Thursday, July 5, 2018

150 - 160 Turner St, Lorimer Precinct

April 2019

The site is reported to have sold for between $8 and $9m, according to The Age (9 April), less than the $10m owners Gary Brill and John Ayres had been seeking a year ago.

A permit is in place for a 36 storey building.

150 - 160 Turner St, May 2019


The 2,618 sq metre site was acquired for $1.05m from the state government in 2003.

July 2018

150 Lorimer St is for sale by Colliers with a permit for a 30 level building.


11 October 2015

While the Minister for Planning is the Responsible Authority for this application in the Lorimer Precinct of Fishermans Bend, the City of Melbourne’s comments were sought

At its planning meeting on 6 October, the Council resolved to write to the Minister advising that they did not support the application for a 30 storey building on a number of grounds including that

  • a majority of apartments rely on borrowed light
  • there was insufficient setback from Turner St (which is proposed to be a linear parkway)

    Unprepossessing 150 Turner St
    • there were insufficient setbacks between podium and tower
    • there were unreasonable wind tunnel effects at ground level
    • it would exceed the density contemplated for Fishermans Bend in the Strategic Framework Plan, was distant from public transport, and would put strain on community services and facilities
    Source

    Report to the Future Melbourne (Planning) Meeting 6 October 2015